July 29, 2014 News, Vegetables No Comments

We are big fans of local food here at Aquaponics in India, and for good reason. Eating locally grown produce not only supports your community and small time growers, but the food will reach your plate fresher and therefore richer in nutrients and better tasting.

We also believe that the more connected people are to the food grown nearby, there will be a greater respect and appreciation for food and where it comes from.

Supermarket chains and their anonymous produce encourages our throwaway culture. Did you know that every year 300 million tons of perfectly good food gets thrown away because it doesn’t meet ‘store standards.’

If a fruit or vegetable is not a perfect shape, the supermarkets won’t stock it.

Given that the global population is rising far faster than we can grow food, adopting changes to minimise waste is essential. Yes, aquaponics can grow more food quicker than traditional farming, (essential with this population growth) but we also don’t want any of our lovely produce to go to waste either!

The European Union has made 2014 the European year against food waste. To support this, an initiative in France has caught our eye – and we’re in love!

Intermarche – France’s third largest supermarket chain has launched ‘Inglorious Fruits and Vegetables.’
People should know where there food comes from, and that it is not always perfect looking (after all – we’re not perfect either!)

Check out the video:

Aquaponics in India will soon be offering consultancy services. Please get in touch for more information.

Pippa Woodhead
Written by Pippa Woodhead
Being a health-nut, London born Pippa has struggled to adjust to the lack of availability of lettuce and kale since re-locating to India. Previously naive to the extent of the worlds food struggles, she has now become obsessed with sustainability in food production and especially in India where it needs it the most (plus she’s also hoping to get her hands on some kale any day now). When she’s not writing for Aquaponics in India, she is usually found with her head in a book or in the kitchen experimenting with new vegetarian recipes.