By 2050, the world’s population will have risen by 2 billion people. Are we ready to feed 9 billion mouths? The answer is no – we do not even feed all the mouths we already have. We are facing a global food crisis!

Food is connected to everything we do. Everything we eat was grown by someone, somewhere. And yet, the gulf between the farmers and what goes on our plate continues to grow ever bigger. This is despite eating being one of the most important things we do – not only do we die without food, but also the nutritional value of what we put into our bodies determines largely what we get out of it and how healthy we will be.

With the population growing faster than our resources can keep up, we need to act now if we are to support ourselves in the future. ‘Sustainability’ has become the new key word for the future of farming, and for good reason. Methods of food production that can be maintained without gobbling up water or taking up too much land are needed.

What is the best way forward so that we can start feeding the mouths we have and avert a global food crisis?

Aquaponics!

By using only 3% water and growing 10 times the plants in half the time and in a fraction of the space – it is clear that this is a very meaningful step in the right direction. Once the initial set-up costs are covered an aquaponics system requires very little up-keep and further cost.

With aquaponics the future looks bright and well nourished!

What are you waiting for?

Aquaponics in India will soon be offering consultancy services. Please get in touch for more information.

Pippa Woodhead
Written by Pippa Woodhead
Being a health-nut, London born Pippa has struggled to adjust to the lack of availability of lettuce and kale since re-locating to India. Previously naive to the extent of the worlds food struggles, she has now become obsessed with sustainability in food production and especially in India where it needs it the most (plus she’s also hoping to get her hands on some kale any day now). When she’s not writing for Aquaponics in India, she is usually found with her head in a book or in the kitchen experimenting with new vegetarian recipes.